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  • BES Household Telephone Survey, 2003, Environmental Behaviors
  • Cary Institute Of Ecosystem Studies
  • O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; Cary Institute Of Ecosystem Studies
  • 2004-09-10
  • The BES Household Survey 2003 is a telephone survey of metropolitan Baltimore residents consisting of 29 questions. The survey research firm, Hollander, Cohen, and McBride conducted the survey, asking respondents questions about their outdoor recreation activities, watershed knowledge, environmental behavior, neighborhood characteristics and quality of life, lawn maintenance, satisfaction with life, neighborhood, and the environment, and demographic information. The data from each respondent is also associated with a PRIZM(r) classification, census block group, and latitude-longitude. PRIZM(r) classifications categorize the American population using Census data, market research surveys, public opinion polls, and point-of-purchase receipts. The PRIZM(r) classification is spatially explicit allowing the survey data to be viewed and analyzed spatially and allowing specific neighborhood types to be identified and compared based on the survey data. The census block group and latitude-longitude data also allow us additional methods of presenting and analyzing the data spatially. The household survey is part of the core data collection of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study to classify and characterize social and ecological dimensions of neighborhoods (patches) over time and across space. This survey is linked to other core data including US Census data, remotely-sensed data, and field data collection, including the BES DemSoc Field Observation Survey. The BES 2003 telephone survey was conducted by Hollander, Cohen, and McBride from September 1-30, 2003. The sample was obtained from the professional sampling firm Claritas, in order that their "PRIZM" encoding would be appended to each piece of sample (telephone number) supplied. Mailing addresses were also obtained so that a postcard could be sent in advance of interviewers calling. The postcard briefly informed potential respondents about the survey, who was conducting it, and that they might receive a phone call in the next few weeks. A stratified sampling method was used to obtain between 50 - 150 respondents in each of the 15 main PRIZM classifications. This allows direct comparison of PRIZM classifications. Analysis of the data for the general metropolitan Baltimore area must be weighted to match the population proportions normally found in the region. They obtained a total of 9000 telephone numbers in the sample. All 9,000 numbers were dialed but contact was only made on 4,880. 1508 completed an interview, 2524 refused immediately, 147 broke off/incomplete, 84 respondents had moved and were no longer in the correct location, and a qualified respondent was not available on 617 calls. This resulted in a response rate of 36.1% compared with a response rate of 28.2% in 2000. The CATI software (Computer Assisted Terminal Interviewing) randomized the random sample supplied, and was programmed for at least 3 attempted callbacks per number, with emphasis on pulling available callback sample prior to accessing uncalled numbers. Calling was conducted only during evening and weekend hours, when most head of households are home. The use of CATI facilitated stratified sampling on PRIZM classifications, centralized data collection, standardized interviewer training, and reduced the overall cost of primary data collection. Additionally, to reduce respondent burden, the questionnaire was revised to be concise, easy to understand, minimize the use of open-ended responses, and require an average of 15 minutes to complete. The household survey is part of the core data collection of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study to classify and characterize social and ecological dimensions of neighborhoods (patches) over time and across space. This survey is linked to other core data, including US Census data, remotely-sensed data, and field data collection, including the BES DemSoc Field Observation Survey. Additional documentation of this database is attached to this metadata and includes 4 documents, 1) the telephone survey, 2) documentation of the telephone survey, 3) metadata for the telephone survey, and 4) a description of the attribute data in the BES survey 2003 survey.This database was created by joining the GDT geographic database of US Census Block Group geographies for the Baltimore Metropolitan Statisticsal Area (MSA), with the Claritas PRIZM database, 2003, of unique classifications of each Census Block Group, and the unique PRIZM code for each respondent from the BES Household Telephone Survey, 2003. The GDT database is preferred and used because of its higher spatial accuracy than other databases describing US Census geographies, including those provided by the US Census. This database includes data only for environmental behaviors: How likely would you be to take part in the following efforts to improve and maintain the quality of the watersheds near where you live, very unlikely, somewhat unlikely, somewhat likely, very likely? a) pay increased recreation or other usage fees, b) support a modest (small) tax increase to be used for water quality issues, c) support legislation to require all developments be set back from streams and flood plains, and d) volunteer to work on cleanup and/or pollution patrols."The response is the percentage of respondents in that Prizm class who score "somewhat likely" or "very likely" on an index across all four of the environmental behavior questions. This is part of a collection of 221 Baltimore Ecosystem Study metadata records that point to a geodatabase. The geodatabase is available online and is considerably large. Upon request, and under certain arrangements, it can be shipped on media, such as a usb hard drive. The geodatabase is roughly 51.4 Gb in size, consisting of 4,914 files in 160 folders. Although this metadata record and the others like it are not rich with attributes, it is nonetheless made available because the data that it represents could be indeed useful.
  • N: 39.724847      S: 38.708367      E: -76.012008      W: -77.314183
  • Publisher: Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne The scientists the BES-LTER Program and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies must receive adequate acknowledgement for the use of data. Please inform the BES Project Facilitator and use a statement such as the following to give credit on any document using the data: 'Data was supported by the Baltimore Ecosystem Study'
  • doi:10.6073/pasta/83a1f908951a060cade3e71c81a4e529
  • https://pasta.lternet.edu/package/eml/knb-lter-bes/41/580
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